Garden Ware with Bruce McLean

Acclaimed conceptual artist Bruce McLean debuts a vast new body of work titled ‘Garden Ware’ that is on exhibition at the V&A in London. The collection includes one-off earthenware creations by McLean, including vases, bowls, platters as well as table ware. There are four designs on fine bone china dinner plates.

Indigo Rain with Faye Toogood

Designer Faye Toogood’s addition to her range of ceramic designs for 1882 Ltd. puts a fresh spin on the forms and traditions of English creamware. ‘Indigo Rain’ adds a touch of contemporary flair to the homely familiarity of blue-and-white striped crockery. The fine earthenware showcases the classic tones of English Delftware: cream offset with a rich, deep blue. Broad bands of indigo glaze - like painterly washes of watercolour - are applied to rough canvas and then transferred directly to the pieces… The characteristic fabric grain lends the ceramics an instantly urban look suggesting dark-dyed denim. With subtly different stripes for every plate, bowl and cup, each piece is reassuringly unique.

Flare with Pinch

Russell Pinch and Oona Bannon are renowned furniture and lighting designers and have reduced the scale in which they design to create Flare. Flare is fine bone china collection that involves generous and curvaceous forms paired with exaggerated ratios delivered via handles and spouts. The shapes offer a sculptural modernity whilst referencing classic form, and make a virtue of light and shadow.  For a radical departure from their usual palette the Festival Jug is a hand painted prestige piece that is wild in colour and takes an arduous five and a half hours to decorate.

Exquisite with Martino Gamper & Friends

Tiago Almeida, Lars Frideen, Max Frommeld, Martino Gamper, Faudet Harrison, Gemma Holt, Jochen Holz, Max Lamb, Will Shannon, Silo Studio, Harry Thaler, Bethan Wood

In the game of consequence, a person is drawn in segments by a group of players on a piece of paper.

The paper is folded after each part is drawn by a different person. This way, later participants cannot see earlier portions.

At the end of the game, the paper is unfolded and the entire humorous drawing is revealed to all.

For Exquisite by 1882 Ltd., 12 desingers conceived an earthenware teapot in a similar fashion.

Each limited-edition set (of 12) includes a teapot and 12 unique mug, each one designed by a single studio.

Jenny with Deborah M Allen

Californian-based artist Deborah’s love of the water has always influenced her work, which often includes references to carved landscapes and the unexpected organic shapes and colours we prize in nature. The result? Gorgeous contemplations of space, fluidity and light. This collection of china showcases Allen’s delicate watercolour techniques and is inspired by Emily’s mother, ‘Jenny’ Johnson. Five per cent of all proceeds from the sale of the collection will be donated to Maggie's Centers.

Turbulence with Justin Landon

A fine bone china tableware collection that highlights the purity of black and white line-work while visualising the flowing and intertwining cycle of air in a solid form. The hand drawn composition and pattern flows from one item to the next, creating a unique interaction between pieces. The effect is amplified when stacking or combining the elements.

White with 1882 Ltd

The purist fine bone china table ware. Designed by Chris Johnson and made in Stoke on Trent. This forms the base of all our collections and the most wonderful foundation for any table.

Crockery with Max Lamb

A collection of fine bone china tableware slip-cast from plaster models carved by hand, with glazed interior for functionality and raw exterior reflecting the modest surface texture of the plaster original.
The process of slip-casting begins with the creation of a three-dimensional model of the design known as a ‘master’ by a professional model-maker, from which the production mould is cast. Crockery bypasses this process by placing the responsibility of both designer and model-maker in the hands of Max Lamb. Using the tools of a stone mason Lamb chips and carves a solid block of plaster to make a series of tableware, the design of each formed quite simply out of their own making.

Accidental Expressionist with Martyn Thompson

A tea set comprising a remake of a Susie Cooper fine bone china teapot and two varying cups and saucers with both pattern and solid coloured glaze effects. The expressionist nature is paramount as it allows for personal curation with the ability to mix and match from a series of solid and patterned items all from Thompson’s sublime colour palette.

Crockery Black with Max Lamb

1882 Ltd’s interpretation of black basalt; equal in richness to the redy brown black developed back in 1766 by Josiah Wedgwood. After eighteen months of development ‘Crockery’ by Max Lamb has been remastered in black basalt. A collection of tableware slip-cast from plaster models carved by hand, with glazed interior for functionality and raw exterior reflecting the modest surface texture of the plaster original.

Cast Bowl with John Pawson

Cast Bowl is conceived as a quiet landscape in ceramic. Glazed in the palest of hues, the play of light and shadow generates endless small shifts of tone across its contours. The piece draws on a particular set of architectural preoccupations - with proportion, line, volume and the precise way in which mass engages with an underlying surface - combining apparent simplicity with rigorous geometry.

Slick & Sleet with 1882 Ltd.

‘Slick’ & ‘Sleet’ by 1882 Ltd. with an extended vase collection by Queensberry Hunt is a collection of uniquely hand glazed items - a true testament to the skill of the Potter. So many factors make up the pattern of the glaze; from the heat of the piece to the weight of the glaze. The Potter works each piece individually making each item unique. Glaze, like ceramic, has a mind of it’s own.

Indigo Storm with Faye Toogood

Faye Toogood's range of ceramic designs for 1882 Ltd celebrates the accidental beauty of natural imperfections. ‘Indigo Storm’ is a bold interpretation of traditional creamware forms; drawing upon the chance patterns created when pigment added to the slip coating does not fully blend. The whorls and eddies resulting from these experiments - like mini meteorological formations - make up the collection's central motifs, appearing on jugs, plates, bowls and cups. The fine earthenware employs the evocative tones of English Delftware: cream offset with the familiar rich blue.

Dunes with Philippe Malouin

‘Dunes’ is a stunning collection of fine bone china tableware and recently launched creamware featuring skillfully hand-crafted plates and bowls from one of the design world’s most celebrated new talents. Slip-cast from plaster models, the collection maximises Malouin’s beautifully minimalistic patterns through analogue 3D-printing. Made by Malouin, the printer creates shapes that cannot be designed by hand or computer - only movement, imperfection and randomised material deposition form the pieces. The shapes formed are carefully utilised and transformed into functional china pieces, highlighting the skill of the craftsman and creating a collection that wonderfully exemplifies its title.

Big Vase 1 & 2 with Max Lamb

You can never have too many flowers. The question is how big can the vase be? ‘Big Vase’ starts life as a solid block of plaster that is hand carved by hammer and chisel into the shape of the vase. A three-part hollow mould is created from the carved plaster form allowing multiple vases to be slip-cast in fine bone china. With all stages of the process being done by hand, the size of the kiln and the immense stress the fine bone china undergoes during firing, size plays a critical factor. ‘Big Vase’ challenges the strength of the potters, the physical properties of the clay, and the technical capabilities of the pottery.

Ink'd with Kiki van Eijk

Ink’d – the fine earthenware collection by Kiki van Eijk - is inspired by many of the people who traditionally worked in the factories – those strong men, emblazoned with tattoos, carefully crafting precious and refined objects! Through studying the techniques of tattooing and working with pigments Kiki created her cleverly curious collection… The top layer is a drawing of an animal (the type spied in traditional English china – a pheasant, rabbit, fish, owl, hedgehog) but given a tattoo-style treatment. Hidden in the pigment layers, you’ll discover smaller creatures, poised to jump out and surprise you at any moment!

Factory with Benchmark and 1882 Ltd.

Factory Candlesticks - a beautiful marriage of wood and ceramic that is a nod to the factories they were crafted in.

Charcoal Storm with Faye Toogood

Faye Toogood's range of ceramic designs celebrates the serendipitous beauty of natural imperfections. Charcoal Storm reinterprets traditional English creamware with a tempestuous motif that draws upon the chance patterns created when pigment added to the slip coating does not fully blend. The dark whorls and eddies resulting from these experiments, like meteorological formations in miniature, make up the collection's central motifs, appearing on pieces including jugs, plates, bowls and cups. Representing a streamlined take on our ceramic heritage, the fine earthenware combines centuries-old Staffordshire traditions with an abstract, tenebrous pattern that evokes a gathering storm.

Plumes with Abby Joy

 Abby Joy is an artist-designer with a sensitivity to everyday beauty, celebrating and highlighting aspects of nature via her uniquely refreshing perspective. ‘Plumes’ is directly inspired from living in the wilds of England’s West Somerset and enjoying the timeless allure of its landscape. Abby’s collection, bearing delicate charcoal-drawn pheasant feathers, has an ephemeral quality in its design. The feather pattern is subtle and uncluttered, creating the effect of an elegant weightlessness to the pieces themselves.

Positive with Snarkitecture

The idea for the collaboration with 1882 Ltd. was to reveal an otherwise unseen aspect of the process behind creating a bone china piece.  Positive is the start of the collection and reflects the simple geometry of cylindrical vase. The other concept visible in Positive  is a play on the fragility and solidity of the bone china material. The edge of the cylindrical form of Positive appears as a thin surface, while inscribed into it's volume is an unexpected interruption. A small volume is excavated from the side of the vessel, leaving an irregular textured surface that plays on the idea of a "broken" vase while contrasting with the smooth cylindrical surface of the piece.

Standard Ware with Fort Standard

Since beginning to work together, Greg and Ian have developed a language and method that has become the unique starting point of their design process. They used various types of communication to build upon each others ideas. In the process surrendering the idea of holistic personal vision for the potential for it to become something new, something that they can both "own" so to speak. So for the development of these objects Greg and Ian quite literally had a conversation via the material they were working in - carving, etching, turning, adding, subtracting, each move informing the next, until they were satisfied that the object is as much something of its own as it is a collection their ideas.

Standard Ware Nude and Stone with Fort Standard

Since beginning to work together, Greg and Ian have developed a language and method that has become the unique starting point of their design process. They used various types of communication to build upon each others ideas. In the process surrendering the idea of holistic personal vision for the potential for it to become something new, something that they can both "own" so to speak. So for the development of these objects Greg and Ian quite literally had a conversation via the material they were working in - carving, etching, turning, adding, subtracting, each move informing the next, until they were satisfied that the object is as much something of its own as it is a collection their ideas.

Nightingale with Maria Jeglinska

The “Nightingale” is a tale written in 1843 by Andersen and tells the story of Chinese Emperor who prefers the tinkling of a mechanical bird (who eventually breaks down) to the song of a real nightingale. "The Nightingale" pattern is composed of two surfaces treated differently one involving a mechanical reproduction of a hand drawn pattern and a second one performed by a skilled crafstman. The latter is hand glazed and does not involve a delibarate decor. It is beautiful in its imperfection. Though different, both surfaces at some point involved a hand generated pattern. The set is built on contrasts of techniques and surfacing: a precise hand drawn decor versus abstract surfaces which form chance patterns.

Tryst with Amy J Hughes

Industry meets the studio maker head-on in this collaborative project between ceramicist Amy Jayne Hughes, the V&A and 1882 Ltd. Aiming to restore the humble vase to its former status as the Ultimate Accessory, the collection elevates the functional object to a design motif and a symbol of the ancient world… Amy Jayne Hughes was the V&A Ceramics Resident from April – September 2015. Gleaning inspiration from the museum’s comprehensive collections, she married elements of her own practice with traditional hand-decorating techniques and the skills and expertise of Stoke-on-Trent’s finest industry. Her mid-18th century-style porcelain vase is more appealing for today’s consumer. The decoration, taken from sprig moulds carefully cast from museum objects, pays homage to the originals whilst finding a new place in contemporary culture. Designed in London, produced in Stoke, each slip-cast fine bone china vase is unique in its finishing, organic rim and painterly splashes, worked with a knowledge of material and history of the subject.

Bone with 1882 Ltd.

FIne Bone China Table Light and Pendant.

Gashu with Alan Hughes

‘Gashu’ – Japanese for elegance, artist and painter – is a fine bone china demi-sphere bowl designed by Alan Hughes. Continuing his passion for design and art, and inspired by the clean functionality of Japanese design, Hughes has created a beautiful bowl that balances on its own accord, highlighting the contrasts of material with the fragility of form.

Power Plant with Lindsey Adelman

As a designer Lindsey has always loved the look of architecture in coastal cities and towns. As a departure point for ‘Power Plant’ she was inspired by the combination of sun-bleached façades amidst water, rocks, plants, boats and terraces. “I love the look of plants overtaking their surroundings; particularly architectural structures,” she says. “I wanted to explore a way of taking these three-dimensional environments and creating real items that can be lived with.” At first sight these are traditional pieces yet they have an obscure, conceptual appeal. Lindsey lends an incredibly feminine quality to her work with a robust and challenging edge.

Reptile Triptych with Nicholas Hughes

A set of hand carved tiles composed of 3 elements. The Reptile Triptych represents a meeting of industrial techniques with the freedom of hand drawing. The figurative hand carved design links over three pieces and can be arranged in several different configurations to form decorative panels of earthenware, in vast and varying repeats. Hand carved directly into the mould; colouration is achieved using a copper reactive glaze.

Doodletron by Nicholas Hughes

A fine bone china vase with embossement depicting the whismical pictorial histories of a set of imagined characters; trasncribed from quill and ink drawings.