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Crockery Black

1882 Ltd.’s interpretation of black basalt; equal in richness to the redy brown black developed back in 1766 by Josiah Wedgwood. After eighteen months of development Crockery Black with Max Lamb has been remastered in black basalt. A collection of tableware slip-cast from plaster models carved by hand, with glazed interior for functionality and raw exterior reflecting the modest surface texture of the plaster original.
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Crockery White

A collection of fine bone china tableware slip-cast from plaster models carved by hand, with glazed interior for functionality and raw exterior reflecting the modest surface texture of the plaster original. The process of slip-casting begins with the creation of a three-dimensional model of the design known as a master by a professional model-maker, from which the production mould is cast. Crockery bypasses this process by placing the responsibility of both designer and model-maker in the hands of Max Lamb. Using the tools of a stone mason Max chips and carves a solid block of plaster to make a series of tableware, the design of each formed quite simply out of their own making.
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Big Vase 1 & 2

You can never have too many flowers. The question is how big can the vase be? Big Vase starts life as a solid block of plaster that is hand carved by hammer and chisel into the shape of the vase. A three-part hollow mould is created from the carved plaster form allowing multiple vases to be slip-cast in fine bone china. With all stages of the process being done by hand, the size of the kiln and the immense stress the fine bone china undergoes during firing, size plays a critical factor. Big Vase challenges the strength of the potters, the physical properties of the clay, and the technical capabilities of the pottery.
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